1. Ford may have used obsolete Takata replacement parts during a previous recall, extending what already feels like a never-ending airbag saga.

    Some Ford dealerships kept defective parts on their shelves long after they should have been tossed, and those wound up being used in vehicles as part of a collision of theft repair. Now Ford needs to re-recall 154,000 vehicles to inspect part numbers and replace the inflators if neccessary.…

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  2. Ford is recalling a problem that can cause a sudden loss of power while driving or an unexpected rollaway while parking. Neither of these things are ideal.

    The issue revolves around excess vibration that can prematurely snap a link shaft bracket somewhere in the powertrain. I'm guessing the transmission? Maybe the flux capacitor? Who can say for sure.…

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  3. Look who’s back in the news – Takata airbag inflators, the long-running nemesis of peace and joy, will need to be replaced in 953,000 Ford vehicles.

    Ford dealers will replace the passenger frontal airbag inflators or modules, but the automaker didn't announce when the recall will begin.…

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  4. Ford has reluctantly settled a class-action lawsuit for using defective Takata airbags.

    Although agreeing to settle the case without the court deciding right or wrong, Ford continues to deny all liability and wrongdoing concerning the vehicles. The automaker says it decided to settle to get the matter over with and avoid the cost of further litigation.

    This isn't the first time Ford has acted reluctant when it comes to Takata problems. Owners can expect to see the following benefits regardless of Ford doing it out of the kindness of their heart or the protection of their checkbooks.…

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  5. There’s a new Explorer carbon monoxide lawsuit in town, and this one is expanding the size of the problem.

    [Plaintiff Mary] Boatner says that on July 6 she drove the Explorer from Alabama to Michigan and noticed a strong chemical odor. Ms. Boatner rolled down her windows for fresh air but the odor was still there … When Ms. Boatner arrived in Michigan, and for several days thereafter, she allegedly experienced restlessness, lack of focus, fatigue, nausea and headaches.

    Mrs. Boatner owns a 2017 Explorer, which falls outside the scope of the current NHTSA investigation.…

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  6. Takata says there are 2.7 million Ford and Nissan vehicles that should be recalled because they contain dangerous airbags.

    Given their propensity to explode in people's faces, it seems only logical to follow that advice. Nissan’s on board but Ford isn’t sold on the idea because the airbags contain a drying agent that’s supposed to protect the inflators.

    Unlike the tens of millions of airbag inflators already recalled in millions of vehicles, the 2.7 million inflators have a drying agent (desiccant) called calcium sulfate used to protect the explosive chemical, ammonium nitrate, from moisture.”…

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  7. "DOOR AJAR" When put together those two simple words strike fear into 2011–2013 Ford Edge owners. According to many, the dashboard warning light never shuts off. Never, ever.

    Yes, even when all the doors are closed. Yes, even after the doors are double and triple checked. Yes, even after the owner slams the dash out of frustration.…

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  8. Ford Edge owners shouldn't expect a recall for any cracked 22" alloy wheels after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) put the kibosh on its investigation.

    The investigation was opened in May 2015 after an owner complained their wheel split and sent the car off the road.

    "NHTSA determined the Ford Edge wheel failed because a severe impact caused a crack in the wheel that eventually expanded around the wheel. Based on the evidence, investigators saw a rough appearance that showed a rapid stress fracture but no abnormalities or unique features associated with the site of the fracture."

    NHTSA did say it will continue to monitor complaints, so if you've had similar issues tell us about it here.

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