1. Ford may have used obsolete Takata replacement parts during a previous recall, extending what already feels like a never-ending airbag saga.

    Some Ford dealerships kept defective parts on their shelves long after they should have been tossed, and those wound up being used in vehicles as part of a collision of theft repair. Now Ford needs to re-recall 154,000 vehicles to inspect part numbers and replace the inflators if neccessary.…

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  2. Most lug nuts are one piece of hardened steel, but Ford chose a design that puts an aluminum cap over a steel core.

    The cap is notorious for swelling and delaminating when it gets hot. It’s also a great place to trap moisture and encourage corrosion. The end result? A lug nut that’s either too big for a standard wrench or fused so tight you need a drill, welding torch, and 7 Hail Marys to remove it.

    A 2017 class-action lawsuit accused Ford of cost-cutting when switching to the two-piece design. It also said the automaker is aware of the problems, but won’t honor its warranty by denying any lug nut related claims.…

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  3. Look who’s back in the news – Takata airbag inflators, the long-running nemesis of peace and joy, will need to be replaced in 953,000 Ford vehicles.

    Ford dealers will replace the passenger frontal airbag inflators or modules, but the automaker didn't announce when the recall will begin.…

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  4. Ford has reluctantly settled a class-action lawsuit for using defective Takata airbags.

    Although agreeing to settle the case without the court deciding right or wrong, Ford continues to deny all liability and wrongdoing concerning the vehicles. The automaker says it decided to settle to get the matter over with and avoid the cost of further litigation.

    This isn't the first time Ford has acted reluctant when it comes to Takata problems. Owners can expect to see the following benefits regardless of Ford doing it out of the kindness of their heart or the protection of their checkbooks.…

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  5. Ford wants the lug nut lawsuit tossed because "the plaintiffs never allege the swollen lug nuts have ever caused physical injuries to any person or damage to any property."

    Ford also says the plaintiffs talk about swollen lug nuts as if the lug nuts should be indestructible and the warranties should last forever, then wrongly "attempt to cast their product-defect allegations as warranty, fraud and unjust-enrichment claims."

    Should lug nuts last forever? Of course not. But they also shouldn't fuse into something harder than a diamond after 10,000 miles on the road.…

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  6. Ford has been sued for switching to a 2-piece lug nut design that features an aluminum cap.

    When exposed to the elements, the cap swells in the heat, cracks and delaminates, and corrodes from moisture. This leaves owners and lessees who get flat tires often stranded on the roads without the ability for even tow truck drivers to remove the swollen lug nuts. This means a tow to the shop just to have the lug nuts removed and the tire replaced.

    The two-piece capped lug nuts are cheaper than a one-piece stainless plug, but they look nice because of the cap. Most owners never think twice about the lug nut when buying a vehicle, only to be met with this headache down the road.

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  7. Takata says there are 2.7 million Ford and Nissan vehicles that should be recalled because they contain dangerous airbags.

    Given their propensity to explode in people's faces, it seems only logical to follow that advice. Nissan’s on board but Ford isn’t sold on the idea because the airbags contain a drying agent that’s supposed to protect the inflators.

    Unlike the tens of millions of airbag inflators already recalled in millions of vehicles, the 2.7 million inflators have a drying agent (desiccant) called calcium sulfate used to protect the explosive chemical, ammonium nitrate, from moisture.”…

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  8. Ford is doing its best to steer clear of an EPAS lawsuit

    , saying the plaintiff's claims don't merit class-action certification because the steering problems are too widespread to prove any "common defect." Nothing says confidence in your product like saying there's too many defects to prove one, singular defect.

    "In addition to denying the electromechanical relays are defective, Ford says the claims should be dismissed because the alleged defects, if they exist, occurred during manufacturing at different times and with different models. Due to this, the plaintiffs cannot claim a "common defect" is associated with the Focus and Fusion cars."…

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  9. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has closed their investigation into electronic throttle body (ETB) problems in Ford vehicles after Ford agreed to fix 1.6 million of their cars and SUVs.

    Just don't call it a recall. Oh no, Ford has spun this one into a "customer satisfaction program." The program extends the warranty on the ETB for up to 10 years or 150,000 miles from the warranty start date of the vehicle and encourages owners to visit a Ford dealer to have their vehicle's software updated.

    The affected vehicles have 2.5L or 3.0L engines.

    All vehicles are eligible for the program through January 31, 2015, regardless of mileage, according to the NHTSA.

    "Owners of the affected vehicles will be contacted by mail to take their vehicle to a Ford dealer who will reprogram the powertrain control module to the latest calibration," said NHTSA in its summary of the investigation.

    A Timeline of Events

    • 2010-2012: Owners report that their Ford and Mercury vehicles equipped with an ETB suddenly surge or stall, sending their vehicles into a limited “limp home mode” that keeps their cars moving but at drastically reduced speeds.
    • October, 2012: The North Carolina Consumers Council petitioned the government to investigate problems with the throttle body in 2005-12 Ford Escapes.
    • February, 2013: The NHTSA opened a preliminary evaluation of certain Ford vehicles for ETB problems, including the 2009-10 Escape and Escape Hybrid, the 2010-11 Fusion and the 2009-10 Mercury Mariner and Mariner Hybrid.
    • March, 2014: After reviewing over 10,000 consumer complaints, the NHTSA closed their investigation after Ford agreed to -recall- open a "customer satisfaction program" on the affected vehicles.

    Owners should have received a letter from Ford, but if you didn’t, call them at 800–392–3673.

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