1. One of Ford's "solutions" to excessive oil concerns in the F-150 was to install new dipsticks with lowered minimum fill level markings. No wonder they're getting sued.

    A proposed class-action lawsuit says Ford needs to properly address oil consumption issues in the 5.0-liter Coyote engine.

    A couple major flaws inside the engine draw excess oil into the combustion chamber where it is burned off. Not only does this mean the engine uses much more oil than advertised, but all that additional carbon buildup causes wear on ignition and emissions equipment.…

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  2. Ford has recalled over 874,000 F-Series trucks with engine block heaters that can start a fire when plugged into the wall.

    The automaker believes a low and unshielded mounting position is allowing road salt to corrode the heater cable’s splice connector, causing at least three known fires.

    Block heaters are made for cold climates. Road salt is too. I'm not sure how those blockheads forgot to shield those cables in the first place.

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  3. Anyone out there having trouble slowing their truck down?

    There’s a lawsuit that says a change to the F-150’s master cylinder design is creating a dangerous braking situation.

    All 2013-2018 Ford F-150s use master cylinders supplied by Hitachi, with the pistons fitted with just a single cup seal responsible for containing pressurized brake fluid. The lawsuit alleges this is unusual because pistons within master cylinders are usually fitted with two cup seals to ensure that fluid does not leak out of the master cylinders.

    These single-seal master cylinders have already been recalled for the 2013 and 2014 model years. But instead of changing the design, Ford replaced the defective part with – I bet you can see where this is going – new defective parts.

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  4. Of all the things that can start a fire in your truck, I’m guessing you were never really worried about the seat belts.

    Well, guess what? Following a lengthy investigation into the seat belt pretensioner system in the 2015-2018 F-150, Ford has decided to recall 2 million trucks that are catching on fire after a crash.

    Between April and October 2017, Ford knew of four reports of localized interior fires that occurred on 2015-2016 F-150s after the seat belt pretensioners deployed. An investigation on the four trucks was opened that focused on the front seat belt pretensioners (both retractor and lap anchor), electrical wiring, insulation and carpeting.

    Pretensioners use a small explosive charge to lock the seat belt in place during an accident. Except, the F-150’s charges aren’t small and have been producing “excessive sparks” that smolder on interior panels and sometimes start a fire.

    The recall covers both the Regular and SuperCrew Cabs.

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  5. Ford owners sure do love their trucks and they just can't seem to stop talking about them.

    It also turns out some of them just can't stop thanks to widespread brake issues. Federal safety regulators are investigating 2015-2016 Ford F-150 trucks after reports of brake pedals going to the floorboards, a complete loss of brakes and dealerships diagnosing the problems as caused by faulty master cylinders.

    We've all heard about putting the pedal to metal, you just never want that to happen with the pedal on the left.

    If all this master cylinder / brake talk sounds familiar, it's because the 2013 and 2014 model years were recalled for the same issue earlier this year. I guess that's one box still unchecked on the Ford engineer's to-do list.

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  6. Ford is bringing back some 2016 F-150s and Explorers because the driver's seat could pop off in a crash.

    The automaker says the seatback may not have been properly welded and could fail to hold the driver in a crash.

    The recall is expected to start on August 15th, 2016.

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