1. Ford is recalling a problem that can cause a sudden loss of power while driving or an unexpected rollaway while parking. Neither of these things are ideal.

    The issue revolves around excess vibration that can prematurely snap a link shaft bracket somewhere in the powertrain. I'm guessing the transmission? Maybe the flux capacitor? Who can say for sure.…

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  2. The Center for Auto Safety (CAS) says enough with the "special programs" and "complimentary service" campaigns,

    it's time for an extensive recall program for 1.3 million Explorers with carbon monoixide problems. The CAS says the SUVs have cracked exhaust manifolds that allow carbon monoxide to enter the cabins and that claims about CO exposure have increased 900% since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) opened an investigation a year and a half ago. That's not even counting the thousands of complaints sent by owners to Ford and sites like CarComplaints.com.

    The "complimentary service" program only lasts until December 31st of this year. The CAS is looking for something more permanent, saying it is possible that Ford and Ford’s customers have just been lucky up until this point, but the time for Ford to take more serious action is now, before that luck runs out.

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  3. The Austin Texas police department is starting to put Ford Explorer Police Interceptors back into service after pulling all 397 off the streets earlier this year.

    An additional 42 used by other city departments were pulled as well. The issue is exposure to carbon monoxide. After multiple officers complained about feeling sick the department made a move to equip all the SUVs with carbon monoxide detectors. Multiple officers filed lawsuits against Ford. At least one officer says the exposure led to nerve damage. Yikes.…

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  4. Another day, another police officer accusing Ford of negligently poisoning them while on the job.

    Austin police officer Ryan Hancock says his symptoms (nausea, headaches and vision problems ) continued the next day and caused him to seek medical help. According to the lawsuit, tests conducted at the hospital showed his symptoms were from carbon monoxide poisoning. Furthermore, the plaintiff says his nervous system has been damaged by the fumes.

    Hancock is represented by Brian Chase, the same attorney repressing officer Zachary LaHood in another carbon monoxide lawsuit against the automaker.…

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  5. Ford will finally address Explorer owner’s concerns about exhaust entering their cabin. Just don’t call it a recall.

    From David Woods on CarComplaints.com Ford announced "complimentary service" for 1.4 million model year 2011-2017 non-police Explorers in North America. Ford insists the SUVs are perfectly safe to drive and the "complimentary service" is not an official recall.

    For whatever reason, Ford appears dead set against recalling this problem. In July 2017, the automaker created a “special program” to fix carbon monoxide (CO) exposure in Explorer Interceptor police vehicles.…

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  6. NHTSA isn’t too happy with Ford’s response to the carbon monoxide problem. Welcome to the club.

    Ford tested 4 Explorers, some that had been repaired using the steps recommended in TSBs, and didn’t find a problem.

    Ford says all these CO levels are well below any standards, especially since investigators found only “momentary" levels that quickly disappeared. In addition, when investigators allegedly drove the SUVs without using wide-open throttles, the carbon monoxide levels were zero.

    NHTSA took Ford’s “there’s nothing to see here” conclusion under advisement, and then promptly upgraded their investigation to an “engineering analysis.” They also expanded it to include the 2011-2017 Explorer, roughly 840,000 vehicles total.

    Game on.

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  7. There’s a new Explorer carbon monoxide lawsuit in town, and this one is expanding the size of the problem.

    [Plaintiff Mary] Boatner says that on July 6 she drove the Explorer from Alabama to Michigan and noticed a strong chemical odor. Ms. Boatner rolled down her windows for fresh air but the odor was still there … When Ms. Boatner arrived in Michigan, and for several days thereafter, she allegedly experienced restlessness, lack of focus, fatigue, nausea and headaches.

    Mrs. Boatner owns a 2017 Explorer, which falls outside the scope of the current NHTSA investigation.…

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  8. Ford Explorer Police Interceptor carbon monoxide problems have led to three police officers suing the automaker after they allegedly crashed their patrol vehicles.

    One of the officers is from Austin. The other suffered a dangerous crash after passing out in their patrol car.

    Ford has been working with police departments to inspect the SUVs and seal any spaces created when aftermarket police-related equipment was installed in the rear of the Explorers.

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  9. 'Tis the season for holiday cookies, silent nights, a dashboard that stays lit like a Christmas tree, and frantically stepping on the gas pedal wondering why your SUV is no longer accelerating.

    OK, those last two are special "treats" for 2016 Ford Explorer owners. Owners complain about vehicles that lose power while driving, leaving drivers urgently pressing the gas pedals to no avail. Symptoms typically include seeing a "wrench light" illuminated with the words, "See Manual," all while the SUV loses speed as it enters "limp home mode."

    If this has happened to you than you'll be happy to hear an investigation has been opened to determine if a lawsuit is needed. It's not as helpful as a recall, but it's a step in the right direction. The investigation is focusing on the throttle body – a part, which many owners have told us, is not readily available.

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  10. A settlement has been reached. This all went down shortly before the trial was set to begin.

    If the court finalizes the settlement, the plaintiffs will include anyone who purchased or leased a 2011-2015 Ford Explorer from Florida Ford dealerships.

    Well, that’s great for Florida residents but it stinks for everyone else. And Explorer owners know all about what stinks.

    Hopefully this settlement will lay the groundwork for future action nationwide.

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  11. Following 154 complaints and an ongoing lawsuit in Florida, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has decided to open an investigation into exhaust fumes entering 2011-2015 Ford Explorer SUVs.

    Typical complaints say exhaust fumes enter the cabins while the Explorers are operating at full throttle, such as when going uphill or merging onto freeways. Owners of the 2011-2015 Ford Explorers also say the fumes can be triggered by turning on the air conditioning in recirculation mode.

    The smells have led to headaches, nausea, and concerns of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    NHTSA says nearly 639,000 model year 2011-2015 Ford Explorer SUVs are included in the investigation.

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  12. Ford is bringing back some 2016 F-150s and Explorers because the driver's seat could pop off in a crash.

    The automaker says the seatback may not have been properly welded and could fail to hold the driver in a crash.

    The recall is expected to start on August 15th, 2016.

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  13. The engine block heaters in the 2016 Explorer are taking "warming up the car" to a whole new level ... by setting the engines on fire.

    Ford Says a "bad combination of the engine block and heater can cause the heater to catch on fire, something that has occurred at least two times in Canada. Fortunately the fires didn't cause any accidents or injuries.

    Ford didn't say when the recall will begin.

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