1. Most lug nuts are one piece of hardened steel, but Ford chose a design that puts an aluminum cap over a steel core.

    The cap is notorious for swelling and delaminating when it gets hot. It’s also a great place to trap moisture and encourage corrosion. The end result? A lug nut that’s either too big for a standard wrench or fused so tight you need a drill, welding torch, and 7 Hail Marys to remove it.

    A 2017 class-action lawsuit accused Ford of cost-cutting when switching to the two-piece design. It also said the automaker is aware of the problems, but won’t honor its warranty by denying any lug nut related claims.…

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  2. Look who’s back in the news – Takata airbag inflators, the long-running nemesis of peace and joy, will need to be replaced in 953,000 Ford vehicles.

    Ford dealers will replace the passenger frontal airbag inflators or modules, but the automaker didn't announce when the recall will begin.…

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  3. Ford has recalled over 874,000 F-Series trucks with engine block heaters that can start a fire when plugged into the wall.

    The automaker believes a low and unshielded mounting position is allowing road salt to corrode the heater cable’s splice connector, causing at least three known fires.

    Block heaters are made for cold climates. Road salt is too. I'm not sure how those blockheads forgot to shield those cables in the first place.

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  4. **Fo

    d announced they’ll soon be recalling more Focus cars to prevent clutch fractures that can lead to fires. They say the cars can experience clutch slips that cause elevated temperatures that damage the clutch plates. This may cause the transmission housings and clutch covers to leak transmission fluid.

    Ford knew about the clutch plate fractures and the threat of fires as evidenced by a previous recall. But it wasn’t until European models with the same B6 transmission started to go up in smoke that Ford decided to expand its previous recall … I guess we could call it, effort?…

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  5. An investigation is being opened into why electric tailgates are opening on their own in 2017 Ford Super Duty trucks.

    The F-250 and F-350 trucks are equipped with electronic tailgates that can be opened with the key fobs, but five owners filed complaints saying the tailgates opened without warning and uncommanded.

    In TSB #17-2196, Ford told its dealers that water could get into a wiring harness and cause “uncommanded tailgate openings” in Super Duty trucks. If the tailgate is down while driving, all the jostling can cause extensive damage.

    Besides, no-one likes getting caught with their tailgate down.

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  6. Ford’s $450,000 supercar is at risk of becoming the world’s most expensive bonfire.

    The automaker says no crashes or injuries have been reported, but one fire was caused by hydraulic fluid that leaked from the valve block assembly. The leaking fluid made contact with hot exhaust parts and caused the fire.

    The recalled 2017-2018 GTs were built between 12/20/2016 and 07/31/2018.

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  7. Anyone out there having trouble slowing their truck down?

    There’s a lawsuit that says a change to the F-150’s master cylinder design is creating a dangerous braking situation.

    All 2013-2018 Ford F-150s use master cylinders supplied by Hitachi, with the pistons fitted with just a single cup seal responsible for containing pressurized brake fluid. The lawsuit alleges this is unusual because pistons within master cylinders are usually fitted with two cup seals to ensure that fluid does not leak out of the master cylinders.

    These single-seal master cylinders have already been recalled for the 2013 and 2014 model years. But instead of changing the design, Ford replaced the defective part with – I bet you can see where this is going – new defective parts.

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  8. Ford has issued a small but important electrical recall for 87 vehicles with improperly secured power supply cables.

    The cables are at the starters and alternators and the unsecured connections could cause electrical arcs. Those arcs could easily start fires.

    There are so many recalls these days that it’s no longer shocking when brand new vehicles get called back for repairs. But it really makes you wonder wire these automakers can’t get their act together.

    Puns aside, find out if your vehicle is affected here. It only takes a minute, so watt are you waiting for?

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