1. Ford is doing its best to steer clear of an EPAS lawsuit

    , saying the plaintiff's claims don't merit class-action certification because the steering problems are too widespread to prove any "common defect." Nothing says confidence in your product like saying there's too many defects to prove one, singular defect.

    "In addition to denying the electromechanical relays are defective, Ford says the claims should be dismissed because the alleged defects, if they exist, occurred during manufacturing at different times and with different models. Due to this, the plaintiffs cannot claim a "common defect" is associated with the Focus and Fusion cars."…

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  2. The pawl spring problem continues to grow, as Ford has announced an expansion of their previous door latch recall.

    That recall is now expanded by 156,000 cars bringing the total to almost 546,000 cars recalled for door latch problems. The expanded recall includes the 2011-14 Ford Fiesta, 2013-14 Ford Fusion and 2013-14 Lincoln MKZ vehicles.

    The question becomes, how many other Ford vehicles use the same defective pawl springs?

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  3. Following an investigation into door latch failures in Ford Fiesta small cars and later expanded to include the Fusion and Lincoln MKZ, Ford is recalling about 390,000 of those cars to replace the door latches.

    Ford says the affected model years are the 2012-2014 Ford Fiesta, 2013-2014 Ford Fusion and 2013-2014 Lincoln MKZ.

    The expanded investigation found issues with the pawl spring tabs, which can break and allow the doors to open while driving. Needless to say, that's a safety no-no and led to the recall.

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  4. Add the 2013 Fusion and Lincoln MKZ to the list of vehicles being investigated for door latch issues.

    Complaints have kept pouring in since the original investigation was opened, and now the government says 207 reports have been filed with NHTSA and another 451 reports were filed directly with Ford. NHTSA says 65 of its complaints claim the doors opened while the cars were in motion.

    The original investigation was opened late last year.

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  5. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has closed their investigation into electronic throttle body (ETB) problems in Ford vehicles after Ford agreed to fix 1.6 million of their cars and SUVs.

    Just don't call it a recall. Oh no, Ford has spun this one into a "customer satisfaction program." The program extends the warranty on the ETB for up to 10 years or 150,000 miles from the warranty start date of the vehicle and encourages owners to visit a Ford dealer to have their vehicle's software updated.

    The affected vehicles have 2.5L or 3.0L engines.

    All vehicles are eligible for the program through January 31, 2015, regardless of mileage, according to the NHTSA.

    "Owners of the affected vehicles will be contacted by mail to take their vehicle to a Ford dealer who will reprogram the powertrain control module to the latest calibration," said NHTSA in its summary of the investigation.

    A Timeline of Events

    • 2010-2012: Owners report that their Ford and Mercury vehicles equipped with an ETB suddenly surge or stall, sending their vehicles into a limited “limp home mode” that keeps their cars moving but at drastically reduced speeds.
    • October, 2012: The North Carolina Consumers Council petitioned the government to investigate problems with the throttle body in 2005-12 Ford Escapes.
    • February, 2013: The NHTSA opened a preliminary evaluation of certain Ford vehicles for ETB problems, including the 2009-10 Escape and Escape Hybrid, the 2010-11 Fusion and the 2009-10 Mercury Mariner and Mariner Hybrid.
    • March, 2014: After reviewing over 10,000 consumer complaints, the NHTSA closed their investigation after Ford agreed to -recall- open a "customer satisfaction program" on the affected vehicles.

    Owners should have received a letter from Ford, but if you didn’t, call them at 800–392–3673.

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