1. Ford is recalling the 2011-2013 F-150 because it can suddenly downshift, causing whiplash and at least five crashes.

    The 6-speed transmission is dropping into 1st gear due to a communication breakdown between the transmission output speed sensor and the powertrain control module (PCM). This can happen at any speed and without warning. Ford believes they can fix the issue with an update to the PCM software.

    Hmm, where have we heard that before?

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  2. Master cylinder leaks are allowing brake fluid to leak into the brake boosters of nearly 271,000 F-150 trucks.

    That stops the boosting and --- not surprisingly --- your ability to come to safely come to a stop.

    Ford says the problem only affects the front wheels, so rear braking isn't affected. But that wasn't enough to stop 9 accidents, however, which have all been attributed to the sudden loss of stopping power.

    The recalled trucks are from the 2013 and 2014 model years. They all have the 3.5-liter GTDI engine and were built between 08/01/13 and 08/22/14.

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  3. The government has closed their investigation into F-150 electric vacuum pump failures, but that's only because Ford has agreed to repair them under a "customer satisfaction program".

    Ford opened customer satisfaction program 15N05 that **extends warranty coverage for the electric vacuum pumps in 2011-2012 Ford F-150 trucks equipped with 3.5L GTDI engines. The satisfaction program extends warranty coverage for up to 10 years of service or 150,000 miles from the warranty start date.

    "All affected F-150 trucks are eligible for the program through July 30, 2016, regardless of mileage."

    You say customer satisfaction program, I say recall. Po-tay-to, Po-tah-to I suppose.…

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  4. F-150 owners can't stop their brake pedals from suddenly falling to the floor. That means they also can't stop their trucks.

    The problem is an empty master cylinder resevoir that's hard to detect because there's never any corresponding brake fluid leaks. It's like a magic trick that no-one finds amusing.

    A new investigation hopes to pull back the curtain:

    "The no-leak symptom is what makes NHTSA believe the fluid is moving from the master cylinder to the brake booster. In addition to that, some owners told NHTSA that Ford dealers have said the same thing."

    The investigation covers 2013-2014 F-150 trucks equipped with 3.5-liter engines. If the problem is confirmed, it should prompt a recall.

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  5. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has closed their investigation into engine problems in the 2011-13 F-150 after Ford sent a technical service bulletin to dealers on how to fix the problem.

    NHTSA had received 95 complaints about the 3.5L EcoBoost engine in F-150 trucks misfiring. The misfires would only happen under humid or rainy conditions.

    The EcoBoost engine uses twin turbochargers that compress air to increase the engine's power, and what Ford found was condensation building up inside of the air cooler tubes. When the condensation is high enough, up to three cylinders can misfire.…

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